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Alcohol Addiction Treatment Centers - Alcohol Treatment Program - Alcohol Recovery Center

Worldwide, addiction continues to severely impact the lives of many, severely lowering their quality of life and impeding their ability to function without the use of substances. Addiction is itself a chronic disease, also known as substance use disorder, that affects the brain chemistry and causes people to engage in compulsive and harming behaviors. As alcohol is the most easily accessible and socially acceptable drug, alcohol addiction (also known as alcoholism or alcohol use disorder) is also one of the most common conditions requiring admission to an addiction treatment program. 

What is Alcohol Addiction?

Alcohol addiction is a chronic disease that is a subset of substance use disorder, known as alcohol use disorder, or AUD. In alcohol addiction, people continue to use alcohol despite the negative consequences that might be affecting their lives.

Like other forms of addiction, alcohol addiction is a chronic, yet treatable disease. It can also range from mild, moderate, to severe, and lead to long-lasting changes in brain chemistry.

How Do I Know If I Have a Drinking Problem?

How much is too much when drinking? Although most people might be able to enjoy a standard drink per day and have no consequences, people with alcoholism cannot control their drinking, or might go years without drinking and then engage in binge-drinking behavior.

Excessive drinking, as defined by the CDC in a study conducted between 2009 and 2011, is having 8 drinks per week for women, and 15 drinks per week for men. Still, people with severe alcohol use disorder can drink far beyond this number, such as having a fifth of alcohol (or 150ml) or several 6 or 12-packs of beer daily.

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Signs of Alcohol Addiction

Unfortunately, the signs of alcohol addiction might not be noticeable right away. Some people might start to notice changes in their drinking patterns suddenly, while others can take years, if not decades, to truly grasp the scope of their addiction.

The National Institutes of Health has categorized people that are able to function with¬†alcoholism¬†and still continue to do their regular jobs and interact with their families as belonging to the Functional subtype. However, just because someone can function with¬†alcoholism¬†does not mean that need less help than someone who immediately notices a change in their drinking patterns. On the contrary, it’s important to pay attention to the signs of¬†alcoholism¬†and get help from an¬†alcohol rehab¬†if you or a loved one notice them.

Signs of alcohol addiction include:

  • Alcohol cravings
  • Blackouts when drinking
  • Increased tolerance to alcohol
  • Increased agitation
  • Mood swings
  • Anxiety
  • Feelings of loneliness
  • Depression
  • Guilt
  • Hiding your drinking from others

If you suspect a loved one is suffering from alcoholism, you might notice other signs such as:

  • Inability to fulfill school or work duties
  • Sneaking or suspicious behavior
  • Asking for money to purchase alcohol
  • Increased legal problems related to alcohol
  • Buying mouthwash or gum to hide their breath, or smelling alcohol on their breath
  • Visible signs of intoxication such as slurred speech or poor balance
  • Changes in demeanor such as low energy or fatigue
  • Loss of interest in things that used to bring them joy
  • Changes in weight, such as weight loss or weight gain
  • Swollen or puffy face

Effects of Alcohol Abuse

Alcohol addiction can not just impact a person themselves, but also those around them. In addition, alcoholism can lead to both long and short-term consequences related.

These include issues such as:

  • Adverse health complications
  • Financial issues
  • Relationship issues
  • Legal issues
  • Impacted ability to work

Health Complications

Excessive drinking even for one day can have short-term health consequences, including dehydration, blackouts, injuries sustained during blackouts, and alcohol poisoning. In fact, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Between 2006 and 2014 the number of alcohol-related visits to the emergency room in the United States increased by a staggering 50%.

Many times, people who have drunk excessively need medical help from a hospital including:

  • Intravenous fluids
  • Oxygen adminsitration
  • Stomach pumping
  • Blood filtration in severe cases

The day after heavy drinking, many people also experience the symptoms of a “hangover,” accompanied by headaches, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and fatigue.

For people with alcoholism, these hangovers can be a daily occurrence, severely limiting their ability to function day to day. Severe alcohol use also has long-lasting health implications. This includes:

  • Increased blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Liver disease, liver cirrhosis, and scarring of the liver
  • Portal hypertension
  • Weakened immune system
  • Digestive issues
  • Increased risk of cancer
  • Mental health disorders such as anxiety and depression
  • Memory issues
  • Learning issues

Although some of these health issues can be reversed using proper¬†alcohol addiction treatment¬†and intervention measures, chronic¬†alcoholism¬†can lead to premature death, hospitalization, and even liver replacement for severe liver damage that can result from alcohol use disorder. In fact, according to the CDC, excessive drinking lead to healthcare costs in the United States to reach $249 billion in 2010 alone. If you don’t have medical insurance, the added financial stress of medical treatment and hospitalization can take its toll on you and your family.

 

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Withdrawal Symptoms

Although the consequences of chronic and acute binge-drinking can be incredibly damaging and serious, it still isn’t enough for some people to stop using alcohol. Like other substances, alcohol causes people to develop a tolerance for alcohol, leading to increased dependence on the substance.

Unfortunately, the more someone drinks, the more difficult it is to quit using alcohol without side effects. These side effects are known as withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal symptoms occur as part of the detoxification process, and can occur in both substance use disorder and alcohol use disorder.

Withdrawal symptoms can result due to both psychological and physical dependence to alcohol.

These withdrawal symptoms can include:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Tremors
  • Dizziness
  • Increased anxiety
  • Increased cravings for alcohol
  • Depression
  • Mood swings
  • Irritability
  • Hallucinations
  • Delirium
  • Shakiness
  • Sweating
  • Headaches
  • Loss of appetite

It’s never safe to assume you can simply stop drinking alcohol and deal with mild withdrawal symptoms. In fact, quitting alcohol suddenly can lead to medical complications, including alcohol withdrawal seizures that result due to changes in brain activity during detox.

Withdrawal symptoms can be so debilitating and painful, people with alcohol use disorder might opt to continue to drink rather than have to undergo the effects of detox. Withdrawal can pose a barrier to alcohol addiction treatment and make it difficult for people to seek help.

Personal Consequences

Alcohol doesn’t just affect someone with addiction, but also their families as well. Studies have shown that loved ones of people with alcohol addiction can suffer from what is known as codependency. Codependency incudes families that might feel the need to support their loved one’s addiction through financial support, even if it hurts them.

Other signs of someone in a codependent relationship can include:

  • Trouble identifying emotions
  • Trouble communicating feelings
  • Low self-esteem
  • Desire to care for others excessively
  • Fear of being unimportant

In addition to developing codependent relationship, alcohol can have severe legal consequences. If you drink excessively, some issues you can face with the law include:

  • DUI charges
  • Public intoxication
  • Open container violation
  • Court-ordered¬†alcoholism¬†treatment
  • Loss of child custody
  • Assault, trespassing, domestic violence, robbery, theft

Research done by CASAColumbia has sadly shown that of the 2.3 million inmates in jails across the United States, 85% were there due to alcohol and substance-involved legal issues.

Alcohol Use Disorder can quickly hinder your ability to work, complete school, care for your family, and maintain friendships.

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Alcohol Addiction Statistics

In the United States, alcohol use disorder affects over¬†14.1 million¬†adults as of 2019. The issue isn’t just with adults either. Over¬†414,000¬†adolescents aged 12 to 17 suffered from¬†alcoholism, showing just how prevalent and serious¬†alcoholism¬†can be for both adults and children.

Of people with¬†alcoholism, many are considered “high-functioning” alcoholics who continue to work and complete other day to day activities, all the while hiding their addiction from loved ones. An estimated¬†19.5%¬†of people with¬†alcoholism¬†in the United States fall under this category. They are typically middle-aged and are well-educated, holding down stable employment.

According to the same research done by the National Institutes of Health, 9% of people in the United States have what is considered severe alcoholism. Sadly, of these people, 80% came from a family where alcoholism was prevelant. This evidence suggests that alcoholism does have genetic traits that can lead to alcoholism, which is then worsened by environmental factors.

Whether or not people who are diagnosed with AUD are homeless or living in a stable environment, both are still at risk of alcohol-related deaths. In fact, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, around 95,000 people, including 68,000 men and 27,000 women, suffer alcohol-related deaths every year. Alcohol is, therefore, the 3rd leading cause of death in the United States that is completely preventable.

Alcoholism & Co-Occuring Disorders

In addition to alcohol use disorder, many people might find themselves also dealing with another mental illness on top of their addiction. Of the over 20 million people living with alcohol and substance use disorder, 37.9% of those people also had a co-occuring mental illness.

Co-occuring disorders are mental illnesses that can either result from addiction, or can contribute to alcohol use disorder. In fact, studies have shown that co-occuring disorders can worsen the effects of alcoholism. Mental illness can also pose a barrier to recovery if mental health treatment is not integrated with addiction treatment.

Some common co-occuring disorders include:

  • Post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, especially in first-responders and veterans who have AUD
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder
  • Major Depressive Disorder
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Borderline Personality Disorder
  • Schizophrenia
  • Un-specified psychotic disorders

Of people with¬†alcoholism, many are considered “high-functioning” alcoholics who continue to work and complete other day to day activities, all the while hiding their addiction from loved ones. An estimated¬†19.5%¬†of people with¬†alcoholism¬†in the United States fall under this category. They are typically middle-aged and are well-educated, holding down stable employment.

According to the same research done by the National Institutes of Health, 9% of people in the United States have what is considered severe alcoholism. Sadly, of these people, 80% came from a family where alcoholism was prevelant. This evidence suggests that alcoholism does have genetic traits that can lead to alcoholism, which is then worsened by environmental factors.

Whether or not people who are diagnosed with AUD are homeless or living in a stable environment, both are still at risk of alcohol-related deaths. In fact, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, around 95,000 people, including 68,000 men and 27,000 women, suffer alcohol-related deaths every year. Alcohol is, therefore, the 3rd leading cause of death in the United States that is completely preventable.

Around 25% of those with serious mental health issues also struggle with addiction
treatment for alcohol addiction

How Is Alcohol Abuse & Addiction Diagnosed?

There are a variety of ways you can diagnose yourself, or help a loved one diagnose themselves and seek treatment. Your primary care provider might also ask a series of questions or refer you to a mental health specialist who can diagnose you with alcohol use disorder.

Some questions they might ask include:

1. How many times per week do you drink?

2. Do you begin to drink early on in the day?

3. If you abstain from drinking and then drink on occasion, do you tend to binge-drink or suffer from blackouts?

4. Do you feel alcohol is negatively impacting your life?

5. Have you faced legal issues due to your alcoholism?

6. What age did you begin drinking, and did it ever become an issue?

7. Do you feel the need to drink due to increased anxiety or to cope with life stressors?

8. Do you find it difficult to turn down a drink or find it difficult to stop drinking once you start?

9. Do you feel guilty after drinking?

10. Have your loved ones, family, or even your doctor grown concerned due to your drinking behaviors?

How Do I Know If I Need Alcohol Addiction Treatment?

If you answer yes to most of those questions above, it might be time to seek help from an¬†alcohol counseling¬†specialist or treatment center. If your family or loved ones feel you would benefit from attending an¬†alcohol treatment center, it could also be a sign you need help even if you feel you don’t need it. Other signs you might need help include:

  • Financial issues
  • Legal issues
  • Feelings of alcohol consuming your life
  • Family problems
  • Severe health problems
  • Being unable to work or attend school
  • Withdrawal symptoms when you try to quit

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Insurance can cover up to 100% of the cost of addiction treatment. All In Solutions accepts most private health insurance policies

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Alcohol Addiction Treatment: Getting Help

Fortunately, there are various types of treatment to help you at any stage of recovery, and that can provide services regardless of how busy your schedule is.¬†Alcoholism, like all other forms of addiction, is a treatable disorder. However,¬†alcoholism¬†is considered to be a chronic disease, meaning treatment will have to be done throughout the course of one’s lifetime.

What is alcohol addiction treatment?

Continued treatment is necessary due to the risk of relapse, which is where a person begins to drink or use drugs again after a period of sobriety. Although it’s unclear as to the prevalence of relapse, it’s estimated that between 20 to 80% of people in remission will experience relapse in the short or long-term.

Therefore, alcohol addiction treatment must be geared toward helping you find the coping skills you need to avoid alcohol use, coping with cravings, and achieving long-term sobriety.

Alcohol Treatment Options

Inpatient Treatment

During inpatient treatment, residents have access to 24/7 medical and support staff in a structured environment. This structured environment can help prevent people from turning to drugs and alcohol during the first stages of recovery, as well as provide medical detox services.

During detox, people might suffer from the effects of withdrawal symptoms and need help minimizing symptoms while also preventing medical complications. A medical detox program provides round-the-clock support to help individuals through the detoxification process.

Inpatient treatment centers also have mental health and alcohol counseling staff available, with addiction groups held everyday. Residential treatment centers also provide a sober living environment in home-style settings. Partial hospitalization programs combine residential treatment with outpatient treatment, requiring individuals to attend morning groups and return home in the evening.

Outpatient Treatment

Once someone completes inpatient treatment, they can opt for outpatient treatment centers that offer flexible services, including alcohol counseling and medication-assisted treatment.

Medication-assisted treatment involves the use of FDA-approved drugs to minimize cravings and reduce the risk of relapse. These include:

  • Naltrexone
  • Acamprosate (Campral¬ģ)
  • Disulfiram (Antabuse¬ģ)

When combined with counseling and therapy, medication-assisted treatment can be highly effective at helping people achieve and maintain sobriety.

In addition, intensive outpatient treatment (IOP) can help people transition from inpatient treatment to regular outpatient treatment.

Individual Counseling/ Therapy

Individual alcohol counseling or group therapy is standard for every alcohol treatment center. Counseling can help people recover from addiction by teaching them coping skills to reduce their need to turn to drugs and alcohol. These therapies can also help treat mental health illnesses, including:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • Dialectical-behiavioral therapy
  • Trauma therapy
  • Dual-diagnosis therapy
  • EMDR
  • Holistic therapy

Support Groups

AA, or alcoholics anonymous meetings, can be a powerful tool to help people in recovery. AA meetings utilize the 12-step personal recovery model, and are held in various locations most hours of the day.

AA meetings can help people have a support group that allows them to remain sober, in addition to having a place to seek help if they feel cravings are posing a barrier to recovery.

Specialized Alcohol Rehab Programs

Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) – Alcohol use disorder is particularly difficullt to treat because of alcohols prevalence in modern society. Temptation is everywhere making relapse incredibly common. Because of these factors, medication-assisted treatment programs have become increasingly popular.

Proven to be effective in reducing relapse rates, medication assisted treatment programs for alcohol addiction utilize medications like Vivitrol, Antabuse, and Campral to minimize cravings and reduce the chance of relapse.

Faith-Based Recovery Program – Since the early 1930’s, even before the program now know as Alcoholics Anonymous was founded, recovering addicts and alcoholics have recognized the power that faith in a higher power can have in transforming their lives. Christian alcohol rehabs and faith-based recovery programs have built on this idea by utilizing Biblical teachings and spiritual principles to supplement the reconstructive program guided by the 12 steps.¬†

In many faith based alcohol programs, including the one offered at All In Solutions, Christian and 12 step elements are combined with evidence-based therapeutic practices to provide biological, psychological, social, and spiritual change. 

Alcohol Addiction Center FAQ

Inpatient treatment can be beneficial for people that need a higher level of care when first beginning addiction treatment. Medical detox services and a highly-structured environment are not the norm in outpatient treatment.

However, outpatient treatment can be beneficial for those with busy schedules who still need to engage in recovery. Flexible morning and evening programs combined with medication can still be effective treatment. Studies have also shown that intensive outpatient treatment programs can be just as effective as inpatient treatment in treating addiction.

Through various alcohol addiction treatment modalities, you or a loved one can experience sobriety and freedom from alcoholism. However, due to alcoholism being a chronic disease, men and women with alcohol use disorder must continue to seek help to prevent relapse and maintain sobriety. However, scientific evidence supports that rehab is effective in producing long-term sobriety as well as reducing the occurences and severity of relapse in the patients who do not stay entirely abstinent.

A patients length of stay is dependent on their needs and their progress during treatment. At All In Solutions, we will work with you to provide an individualized treatment plan that will work for you and get you home as soon as you are ready.

The cost of rehab depends on the program and your insurance provider. In some cases, addiction treatment is entirely covered by health insurance. To get a better idea of the out-of-pocket cost of treatment at All In Solutions, give us a call or visit our scholarship and insurance verification page.

To get started, simply give us a call! Our admissions team will collect your health insurance and demographic information to assess any financial responsibility you may have. After that, you will complete an assessment that will be reviewed by our clinical and medical team so that we can identify a treatment plan that is likely to work for you. Once you are approved for admission, our admissions team will help you come up with a plan to tie up any loose ends like speaking to your employer or family, and plan your intake. 

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